We will see Jesus Again

Learning for Life9:30 am
Worship Service: 11:00 am

Bulletin: April 22, 2018

Newsletter: April 2018

Scriptures: 1 Peter 2:11,12; Psalm 84; John 16:16-22;

Songs:

Rev. Joel Russell-MacLean

Everyday life can come with pain and anguish. These past few weeks have brought that truth home once again in a terrible way.

On the last night of his life, Jesus sat with his friends knowing pain and death were coming for him in the morning. He knew his friends didn’t understand. And in the midst of his own fear, he tried to console them.

Let’s be clear: he tells them to expect anguish and pain too. Jesus doesn’t link all human anguish and pain to a lack of knowledge or spiritual development. In fact, knowing Jesus might even intensify the suffering.

Well, thanks for the good news! Why are you telling us this?!

Jesus pleads with his friends to hold on until the end: “In a little while, you will see me… I am telling you the truth: you will cry and weep, you will be sad, but your sadness will turn into joy… I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart!”

Christians do mourn. Christians mourn as they realize more and more just how far the world is from being what it could be. They long to see Jesus again. The more you know Jesus, the more his absence hurts.

But Christians do not mourn without hope. One day, the mourning will turn to celebration.

I can’t help but hear Bono from U2 singing these very words:

“In a little while,
Surely you’ll be mine.
In a little while, I’ll be there”

“In a little while,
This hurt will hurt no more.
I’ll be home, love.”

Listen to the whole song: In a little while

As often is the case, U2 lyrics’ in this song seems to express a longing and hope beyond a simple youthful romance. As Bono tells us in this video, Joey Ramone of influential punk band The Ramones fame, asked to hear this song as he passed away.

Following in the Steps of Jesus, the Good Shepherd

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Learning for Life9:30 am
Worship Service: 11:00 am

Bulletin: April 15, 2018

Newsletter: April 2018

Scriptures1 Peter 2:19-25Psalm 16John 10:11-16

Songs:

Mark Doerksen

We’ve come to know about the Good Shepherd through Scripture passages like Psalm 23 and John 10. We know that John the Baptist refers to Jesus as the Lamb of God, the one who takes away the sin of the world. Yet those who follow Christ are also sometimes referred to as sheep. What might these metaphors mean, both for Christ and for those who follow?
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Rev. Mark Doerksen is the Area Minister for the churches of Saskatchewan and Manitoba which belong to the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada. Mark was a Pastor for 17 years before stepping into his current role. Mark lives in Winnipeg with his wife Mary and their two children.

Read the CBWC’s newsltetter “Connections” to hear the stories from others church. You can sign up to receive these directly by email at the bottom of the Connections page

Something New in the Old World

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Learning for Life9:30 am (resumes April 8)
Worship Service: 11:00 am

Bulletin: April 8, 2018

Newsletter: April 2018

Scriptures: 1 John 5:4-12Psalm 81:1-10John 20:19-29

 Songs:

Rev. Joel Russell-MacLean

 Comic books and superhero movies feature characters like Kitty Pryde that can move through solid objects. Of course, a person moving through a wall is impossible… or is it? Because Science with Kyle Hill has fun with this question and leaps into a short lesson in physics.
What about Jesus’ resurrection? Jesus seems to appear and disappear, and perhaps even walk through walls and locked doors. Could modern science show us that this is actually possible? Or were they all just supernatural, spiritual events?
Jesus’ new life was not a rejection of the physical world but it wasn’t limited by it either. And Jesus life wasn’t a purely spiritual reality, the Spirit was coming to be united with the world. 
 
What Jesus’ witnesses found both hard to accept and yet hard to deny was that Jesus had a recreated, transformed physical body. It was impossible and yet right there in front of their eyes. 
Jesus’ resurrection represented a new reality birthed from an old reality. In Jesus, God brought into being a new kind of life, eternal life, out of sin infected life ruled by death.
 
Go deeper: In “The Resurrection”, Alister McGrath (PhDs, University of Oxford, in both Science and Theology) discusses common objections to Jesus’ resurrection and what that event means for us today.

Reason, Trust, and Resurrection

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Learning for Life: 9:30 am (resumes April 8)
Worship Service: 11:00 am

Bulletin: April 1, 2018

Newsletter: April 2018

Scriptures: Colossians 3:1-4Psalm 118John 20:1-18

Songs:

Rev. Joel Russell-MacLean

“Unless I see it with my own eyes, I can’t believe it,” is a well-known saying, but no one actual lives like that.

In fact, more often than not, until someone explains something to us, describes it, and points it out, we do not recognize it. After someone pointed out Yellow Warblers to me, I began seeing these brilliant yellow birds everywhere I went in the city. How could I have missed them before? If I had refused to believe my teacher, would I have seen them?

Yes, being asked to believe in Yellow Warblers is one thing while claiming that Jesus was killed, buried, and then rose from the dead with a transformed body is quite another thing.

In John’s account of the resurrection, faith, knowledge, and experience all work together. There are many kinds of knowledge where the starting point is faith or trust. The disciple Thomas famously insisted that he would need to touch the wounds in Jesus’ body before he would believe in the resurrection.

But the response of the first eyewitnesses to the empty tomb, and then to seeing Jesus alive, was trust (or faith) in the midst of their confusion and uncertainty – trust in God and trust in Jesus.

For 2000 years now, in the middle of uncertainty and confusion, new Christians have found their first steps of faith rewarded with their own encounters with Jesus and a growing understanding, just like the first witnesses.

The Courage of Jesus

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Learning for Life: 9:30 am (resumes April 8)
Worship Service: 11:00 am

Bulletin: March 25, 2018

Newsletter: March 2018

Scriptures: Philippians 2:5-11Psalm 22Matthew 21:1-17

Songs:

Rev. Joel Russell-MacLean

“See, your king comes to you,
righteous and victorious,
lowly and riding on a donkey” Zechariah 9.9

In an act that led to his death, Jesus rode into Jerusalem while the crowd around him cheered and waved palm branches. Choosing to ride into Jerusalem like this was an overt political statement. Jesus was deliberately announcing his political leadership using symbols everyone would have understood.

He was also saying something about the nature of his leadership – he was not riding a chariot or a horse trained for war. Jesus came with gentleness and humility.

Every Palm Sunday, the church announces once again that Jesus still claims to be the highest authority.

The leadership in Jerusalem rejected Jesus’ claim back then. Jesus made no effort to use force and did not defend himself and as a result he was crucified.

Today, Jesus comes riding into our lives. He is still claiming to be in charge – what is your response?

 
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